WRUR 88.5 Different Radio

World Cafe

The premier public radio showcase for contemporary music serving up an eclectic blend that includes blues, rock, world, folk, and alternative country.

Courtesy of the Artist

Inspired by her great uncle, a Grenada-born cabaret star, Ala.Ni, has been singing since childhood. It shows on her new, acapella album, You & I.  She reflects on the secret love affair that inspired it and more, today on the World Cafe. https://www.vuhaus.com/embed/v2/videos/a594467e-c7a9-4d40-9528-c0a0a096a22e?autostart=false#

The country-music business is show business, whether the bright lights shine at the Grand Ole Opry or at a small dance hall on a lonely Western highway. Mark Wystrach, lead singer for Midland, learned the ropes of that business working at his parents' restaurant and dance hall, the Steak Out, in Sonoita, Ariz. Later he became an actor in Los Angeles, where he met Jess Carson, an Oregon farmer's son, and Cameron Duddy, a Hollywood kid whose love of music had led him to country, too.

Feist On World Cafe

Jul 25, 2017

Leslie Feist's latest album, Pleasure, is gritty, defiant and intimate in a way that's different from anything else we've heard from her. And when she wrote it, she was having a hard time feeling — well, pleasure. She explains in this session that she chose that word as a way to try and talk herself out of the dark feelings at the other extreme.

Courtesy of the Artist

Feist is back with her first album in six years; it's called Pleasure. Tune in to the World Cafe to find out more about the complex emotions behind the record and how it represents a period of reflection for the famed Canadian singer.   

I'm willing to bet you've never seen a "Best Of" list quite like this one. "Turning The Tables" ranks the 150 greatest albums made by women. It's a partnership between NPR Music and Lincoln Center, led by Lincoln Center's Jill Sternheimer and our Nashville correspondent, Ann Powers.

Ann stopped by World Cafe to share some of the artists that made the list and to talk about the No. 1 album. She'll also reveal surprises, controversial picks and one solid conclusion: "Every single one of these albums, they are all amazing."

Recorded in Music City at RCA's legendary Studio A, Jason Isbell's latest album, The Nashville Sound, tackles issues like race and privilege, anxiety, sobriety, hope and family. (Isbell is married to Amanda Shires, a talented fiddle player and singer-songwriter who is also a member of Isbell's band, The 400 Unit; they have a toddler named Mercy.)

Every month, NPR Music asks our friends from public radio stations across the country — hosts, music directors and writers — for the new songs they simply can't stop listening to. Sometimes they're hot tracks that have dropped just the week before, and sometimes they're songs that have taken a couple months to slow-burn into our memories. Either way, the result is a mix that's perfect for the moment.

EVA VERMANDEL / COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

Legendary British folk singer, Shirley Collins, performs music from Lodestar, her first release in nearly four decades in an encore edition of the next World Cafe. She shares the painful personal experience that kept her from singing for decades and what finally led her back to recording. 

Galea McGregor / WXPN

  It's the start of encore week, and Josh Tillman, who performs as Father John Misty, tackles survival, capitalist greed, climate change and the apocalypse on his latest album Pure Comedy. He talks about the humanity, humor and heart behind it, and performs live in an encore edition of the next World Cafe.   

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