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Roy Montgomery's music is like swimming through phantoms, each entity a haunting, illuminating new spectral phase. It was Montgomery's guitar work and deep, warbling vocals that have disoriented far-out New Zealand rock bands like The Pin Group, Dadamah and Dissolve, along with his solo material, since the 1980s. But Montgomery has always been self-effacing about his own voice: "It's lazy," he told Perfect Sound Forever in 2003.

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(SOUNDBITE OF THE CARTERS' SONG, "APES**T")

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The horns burst, the voices wail and, as if about to launch into a sermon, this author, activist, intellectual, pastor and singer introduces himself: "My name is Rev. Sekou and these are the Seal Breakers, now they from Brooklyn." He points to his band and continues, "but I was raised in in a little old place called Zent, Arkansas that's got about 11 houses and 35 people, and they'd work from can't-see morning to can't-see night and then they'd make their way to the juke joint.

Composer and conductor Oliver Knussen, one of Britain's most influential contemporary classical figures, died Monday at the age of 66. His passing was announced by his publisher, Faber Music, but no cause of death was given.

People who love the band Dawes really love the band Dawes. Songwriting and musicianship aside, I think one of the things fans latch on to is that this is a band that feels like a good hang. The band's current lineup includes Taylor Goldsmith, along with his brother Griffin on drums, Wylie Gelber on bass; and Lee Pardini on keys. Whether you listen to its records on long car rides or in college dorm rooms or in dive bars or at wedding receptions, Dawes feels like good company.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. It seems like this guy's everywhere, right?

(SOUNDBITE OF DJ KHALED SONG)

DJ KHALED: (Rapping) DJ Khaled.

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