WRUR 88.5 Different Radio

Lars Gotrich

We often label new music "out-of-time" when its touchstones are from the past. But what does that time mean when it spans decades and cultures, swirled into nonlinear pop songs that glide the spaceways?

I may have screamed. Thankfully, I am surrounded by understanding and fellow Paramore fans in the office. Four long years after its genre-spanning pop album Paramore, the band is back with After Laughter, out May 12.

There is regular brains rock music and there is broken brains rock music. No slight against the former, but sometimes squares gotta be oblonged and thought patterns obliterated. Mark Feehan and Kilynn Lunsford both made a regular habit of scrambling brains with Harry Pussy and Little Claw, respectively, but with their new Philly-based band, they rock the body manic.

Katie Crutchfield has been nothing but honest as Waxahatchee. Her careful words carry keen insight — and she writes sharp songs to match. Waxahatchee's fourth album, Out In The Storm, takes a hard look not just at broken relationship, but also at the spiraling aftermath.

Bert Jansch's percussive fingerpicking was rooted in traditional folk music, but he swung around melodies like a jazz musician, the rhythms swaying in his Scottish soul. Turns out that even skilled guitarists who admired Jansch couldn't figure him out.

No label, no careShamir just gifted us with a new album and it's already making Monday a whole lot brighter.

Hope was recorded over the weekend, a whirlwind attempt for the unclassifiable pop star to fall in love with music all over again.

Tell me if you've heard this one before: Lindsey Buckingham, Christine McVie, Mick Fleetwood and John McVie walk into a studio... and actually make a record together. Fleetwood Mac's drama-filled history is the stuff of a "great play," to say the least.

That bopping beat, that thick and wobbly synth bass, those voices — it's like I'm back at a middle school dance in the Atlanta suburbs, not knowing what to do with my hands.

Pages