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David Kestenbaum

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Now we have the story of information you get from your doctor as well as information you do not.

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College textbooks are expensive. You probably already know this. A new biology or economics book can cost $300.

And prices have been soaring, doubling over the past decade, growing faster than the price of housing, cars, even health care.

But, surprisingly, the amount students actually spend on textbooks has not been rising. In fact, the best data we could find on this shows students have been spending a bit less over time.

An economic indicator commonly called the VIX, volatility index, is also known as the fear index. Whatever you call it, the index is hitting lows not seen since before the financial crisis.

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And now, 4,000 years of economic growth in seven minutes. This story comes, of course, from our Planet Money team. David Kestenbaum and Jacob Goldstein bring us the history of light and how the world came what it is today.

A couple years ago, Adrienne McAdory read that the organization that sets the rules for Web addresses was going to allow people to apply for new top-level domains. No longer would there be just the old top-level domains like .com and .gov. People could apply for any new top-level domain they wanted.

McAdory liked the idea, but it took her awhile to figure out the right domain.

"I was thinking about lifestyle," says McAdory. "My girlfriends and I just had incessant conversations about 'Oh, we're not married, can't find the right guy, blah, blah, blah.'"

In 1895, legislators in New York state decided to improve working conditions in what at the time could be a deadly profession: baking bread.

"Bakeries are actually extremely dangerous places to work," says Eric Rauchway, a historian at the University of California, Davis. "Because flour is such a fine particulate, if it gets to hang in the air it can catch fire and the whole room can go up in a sheet of flame."

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