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Brian Naylor

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.

In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies, including transportation and homeland security.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many of the major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Journalism award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

Updated at 8:15 p.m. ET

The National Archives has published more than 2,800 records related to the assassination of former President John F. Kennedy. Journalists and history aficionados are digging through the files to see what — if any — new information can be gleaned.

Earlier Thursday, President Trump had issued a memo to executive agencies ordering the release of the records.

On a scale of 1 to 10, President Trump said Thursday that his administration deserves a "10" for its response to the devastation caused on Puerto Rico by Hurricane Maria.

Trump spoke after his meeting in the Oval Office with the U.S. territory's governor, Ricardo Rossello, who — when asked by Trump "did we do a great job?" — said, "You responded immediately, sir."

Few of us would want the love letters we wrote to our sweethearts at age 21 released to the public. But when you've been president everything in the past is ripe for perusal by historians, researchers and journalists.

And so it is with the love letters of former President Barack Obama — excerpts of which have been released by Emory University's Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives and Rare Book Library, where the letters a young Obama wrote to then-girlfriend Alexandra McNear are now part of the collection.

Updated at 5:28 p.m. ET

President Trump solemnly addressed the nation Monday morning about Sunday night's mass shooting in Las Vegas, saying Americans are "joining together in sadness, shock and grief."

After the candidate whom President Trump backed in Tuesday's Alabama Senate primary, Luther Strange, lost to Roy Moore, Trump summarily deleted several tweets he had made in support of Strange. However, they were archived on ProPublica's Politiwhoops website.

Among them: "Luther Strange has been shooting up in the Alabama polls since my endorsement. Finish the job-vote today for "Big Luther"

And: "ALABAMA, get out and vote for Luther Strange-he has proven to me that he will never let you down!#MAGA"

Rep. Steve Scalise, R-La. made an emotional return to Congress Thursday morning for the first time since he was shot during a baseball practice in June.

"You have no idea how great this feels to be back at work in the people's house," he said, as he addressed a packed House chamber.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions defended his boss's criticism of NFL players for kneeling in protest during the national anthem, saying Tuesday that President Trump has "free speech rights, too."

Sessions defended Trump's controversial remarks as he criticized college speech policies during an address at the Georgetown University Law Center. "Freedom of thought and speech on the American campus are under attack," he said.

"In this great land," Sessions also said, "the government does not get to tell you what to think or what to say."

President Trump is facing a decision on whether to extend the ban on travelers from six majority-Muslim nations from entering the U.S. This week, acting Homeland Security Secretary Elaine Duke sent the White House her recommendations for "tough and tailored" security vetting, to replace the current ban, which expires Sunday.

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