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Native American leaders and a U.S. State Department official are urging a French auction house to call off a sale of sacred art and artifacts.

The world is not ready for the next big pandemic. That's what health officials have been saying for years. If a deadly flu strain spreads around the globe, we could be in trouble.

This week the health leaders are trying to change that. They're gathering in Geneva for the World Health Organization's annual meeting, the 69th World Health Assembly. At the top of the agenda: reshaping WHO into an agency that can take action during a health emergency instead of just giving out advice.

House Speaker Paul Ryan shot down reports Wednesday that he was on the verge of endorsing Donald Trump for president.

Whenever I'm out reporting in the field, I can tell many ranchers have a powerful connection with their cattle — it seems they can almost understand them. But researchers today are digging deeper to figure out exactly what cows are saying — and how they communicate through their moos.

I drove out to the research farm at the University of Missouri to ask cattle geneticist Jared Decker to share his expert insights.

Rose has dealt with depression since high school. She'd put her head down, focus on school and get through. But during her senior year of college, Rose couldn't even concentrate on school anymore.

"I was struggling. I was feeling depressed. I was feeling isolated," Rose, now 24, says. "I was crying at Cheerios commercials, which is not normal."

Chechen strongman Ramzan Kadyrov and HBO host John Oliver are locked in a public spat over a lost cat.

First, Kadyrov — the leader of the Russian republic of Chechnya whose forces have been accused of torture — asked his 1.8 million Instagram followers for help finding his missing cat.

Renewed controversy over heavy American military presence on the Japanese island of Okinawa swirled as President Obama arrived in Japan for the G7 summit. Just a week earlier, a former U.S. Marine allegedly raped and killed a local Okinawa woman, triggering protests on the island.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Afghan Taliban have announced their next leader: Mullah Haibatullah Akhundzada, an extremist scholar with no military experience.

With the announcement, the Taliban confirmed that their previous leader, Mullah Mohammed Akhtar Mansour, was killed by a U.S. drone strike in Pakistan last week.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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