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NPR History Dept.
10:03 am
Sat July 4, 2015

When America's Librarians Went To War

American Library Association volunteers in Paris on Feb. 27, 1919.
Courtesy of the University of Illinois Archives

Originally published on Sat July 4, 2015 5:55 pm

Looking back at the nationwide support for American troops in the two world wars, we see Americans of all stripes making patriotic contributions and sacrifices — including farmers, factory workers and librarians.

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Parallels
9:07 am
Sat July 4, 2015

A Reopened Embassy In Havana Could Be A Boon For U.S. Businesses

A fisherman cycles past the U.S. Interests Section building, behind right, in Havana in May.
Desmond Boylan AP

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 1:09 am

When Secretary of State John Kerry goes to Havana to raise a flag over the soon to be reopened embassy this summer, it won't be just an important symbolic moment.

The administration says the U.S. will be able to station more American personnel in Cuba, and that should be a big help in practical terms as more Americans travel to and trade with the Cold War-era foe.

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The Two-Way
8:44 am
Sat July 4, 2015

Greek Official: 'Grexit' Would Cost Europe A Trillion Euros

Greek Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis speaks to the assembled media as he leaves his office in Athens.
Daniel Ochoa de Olza AP

Originally published on Sat July 4, 2015 1:17 pm

Greece's finance minister has accused his nation's creditors of "terrorism" for trying to "instill fear in people" ahead of a referendum on whether to accept the harsh terms of an international bailout designed to keep Athens in the eurozone.

Yanis Varoufakis, in an interview with the Spanish daily El Mundo, said that there was too much at stake for his country to be kicked out of Europe's common currency — "as much for Greece as for Europe, I'm sure."

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The Two-Way
7:54 am
Sat July 4, 2015

Just A Few Important Words About The Declaration Of Independence

Artist John Trumbull's Declaration of Independence. It can be seen in the rotunda of the U.S. Capitol.
Library of Congress

Originally published on Sun July 5, 2015 12:11 pm

"We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness."

It's Independence Day. Let's take a break from parades, patriotic songs and pyrotechnics to think about the Declaration of Independence, which was adopted by the Continental Congress on July 4, 1776.

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Shots - Health News
7:54 am
Sat July 4, 2015

LA Police Unit Intervenes To Get Mentally Ill Treatment, Not Jail Time

Officer Ted Simola, a member of the LAPD mental evaluation unit, responds to a call in February.
Maya Sugarman/KPCC

Originally published on Sun July 5, 2015 8:14 am

The Los Angeles Police Department's mental evaluation unit is the largest mental health policing program of its kind in the nation, with 61 sworn officers and 28 mental health workers from the county.

The unit has become a vital resource for the 10,000-person police force in Los Angeles.

Officer Ted Simola and his colleagues in the unit work with county mental health workers to provide crisis intervention when people with mental illness come into contact with police.

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Around the Nation
7:54 am
Sat July 4, 2015

'Chasing Memories' In Their Refugee Camp 40 Years After Fleeing Vietnam

Former refugee Kuo Nam Lo, the reporter's mother, stands outside an old army barracks that's been converted into the Pennsylvania National Guard Military Museum at Fort Indiantown Gap.
Hansi Lo Wang NPR

Originally published on Sat July 4, 2015 11:04 am

My mother's family fled communism twice.

The first time was from China. Then, after Saigon fell in 1975, they left Vietnam.

My mother, Kuo Nam Lo, was 24 when she spent her first few months in the U.S. at a refugee camp at a military base along a stretch of the Appalachian Mountains in central Pennsylvania.

"I've always wanted to come back here," my mother told me in Cantonese on a recent drive through Fort Indiantown Gap. "Son, you've made my dream come true."

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Europe
7:54 am
Sat July 4, 2015

Greeks Divided Ahead Of Eurozone Vote

Originally published on Sat July 4, 2015 11:04 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ERIC WESTERVELT, HOST:

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Middle East
7:54 am
Sat July 4, 2015

Fuel Is Crucial In The Battle Over Syria

Originally published on Sat July 4, 2015 11:56 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

National Security
7:54 am
Sat July 4, 2015

The White House Invites Tourists To Use Their Cameras

Originally published on Sat July 4, 2015 11:04 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ERIC WESTERVELT, HOST:

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Law
7:54 am
Sat July 4, 2015

Of All U.S. Police Shootings, One-Quarter Reportedly Involve The Mentally Ill

Lavall Hall's mother, Catherine Daniels, is comforted by her cousin Alfonzo Hill as she speaks with the media in February. Hall, who was schizophrenic, was fatally shot by police officers earlier this year.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Sat July 4, 2015 3:48 pm

At least 125 people with signs of mental illness have died in police encounters in the U.S. so far this year, according to the latest accounting from The Washington Post.

This week, the Post published a database with information on every fatal shooting by a police officer in the line of duty in the U.S. And they took the extra step of identifying — when they could — details about the mental health of the deceased.

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