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All Tech Considered
5:05 am
Wed July 29, 2015

Beam Me Up? Teleporting Is Real, Even If Trekkie Transport Isn't

Star Trek's Mr. Spock and Captain Kirk never even lose pocket change when they use a transporter to get from TV's Starship Enterprise to distant worlds. What gives?
Paramount Television/The Kobal Collection

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 2:02 pm

"I have a hard time saying this with a straight face, but I will: You can teleport a single atom from one place to another," says Chris Monroe, a biophysicist at the University of Maryland.

His lab's setup in a university basement looks nothing like the slick transporters that rearrange atoms and send them someplace else on Star Trek. Instead, a couple million dollars' worth of lasers, mirrors and lenses lay sprawled across a 20-foot table.

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Sweetness And Light
4:58 am
Wed July 29, 2015

Deford To Hollywood: Ban Boxing Movies

Actor Jake Gyllenhaal stars in Southpaw, a new movie about a junior middleweight boxing champion who faces adversity.
Scott Garfield The Weinstein Company

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 1:38 pm

Some people wanna ban boxing. I just wanna ban boxing movies.

You get the feeling sometimes that Hollywood still thinks Joe Louis is heavyweight champion and boxing is still top-tier popular? Yes, there's yet another boxing movie out, this one entitled Southpaw.

Oh, please, please. Making boxing movies when boxing is so passé would be like if Hollywood kept making showbiz movies about vaudeville.

Click the audio above to hear Frank Deford's take on movies about boxing.

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Parallels
6:42 pm
Tue July 28, 2015

Investigation Underway Into Killing Of Cecil, Zimbabwe's Best Known Lion

Cecil the lion is shown walking in Zimbabwe's Hwange National Park in a YouTube video from July 9, 2015. Credit: Bryan Orford
Bryan Orford YouTube

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 3:12 pm

Conservationists are lamenting the hunting and killing of a well-known lion from western Zimbabwe's Hwange National Park.

The black-maned lion, named Cecil, was 13 years old and had become popular among tourists from around the world.

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NPR Ed
5:38 pm
Tue July 28, 2015

Is This The Beginning Of The End For The SAT And ACT?

Carol McMullen-Pettit (right), a Premier Tutor at The Princeton Review, goes over SAT test preparation with 11th-grader Suzane Nazir in Pembroke Pines, Fla.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 7:07 am

Many high schoolers hoping to attend George Washington University in Washington, D.C., one of the top private universities in the country, breathed a sigh of relief this week.

GWU announced it will no longer require applicants to take the SAT or ACT.

The move comes after the school formed a task force to study the pros and cons of going "test-optional." GWU attracts lots of high-achieving students who do well on both exams, but the task force concluded that the school's reliance on these tests was excluding some high-achieving students who simply don't test well.

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The Two-Way
5:32 pm
Tue July 28, 2015

Researchers Warn Against 'Autonomous Weapons' Arms Race

Originally published on Tue July 28, 2015 7:01 pm

"Starting a military AI arms race is a bad idea," says a group of researchers and concerned citizens who are urging a ban on offensive military weapons that don't rely on human control. The group signed an open letter that's being delivered at a conference on artificial intelligence this week.

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It's All Politics
5:00 pm
Tue July 28, 2015

After Hope For Early Release, Prisoners' Applications Stuck In Limbo

Dana Bowerman's lifelong best friend Michelle Elliott holds a photograph of the two together. Bowerman is serving a nearly 20-year sentence for federal drug conspiracy charges. She was holding out hope for clemency for nonviolent drug offenders but it is unlikely that she will receive an early release date.
Matthew Ozug NPR

Originally published on Tue July 28, 2015 6:31 pm

It took a while for Dana Bowerman's long prison sentence to sink in.

Bowerman is a onetime honor student and cheerleader whose brassy personality cleared most obstacles from her path. But there was one hurdle her quick mind couldn't leap. In early 2001, Bowerman got sent away for nearly 20 years on federal drug conspiracy charges, her first and only offense. It wasn't until two years in, in her bunk behind a fence in a Texas prison, that her fate seemed real.

"It was a hard swallow," Bowerman said.

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U.S.
5:00 pm
Tue July 28, 2015

During Pool Season, Even Lifeguard Numbers Are Taking A Dive

A shortage of lifeguards across U.S. cities could be a fallout of the recovering economy.
Christopher Corr Ikon Images/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 28, 2015 6:31 pm

A teenager locking down a summer job as a lifeguard used to be a big deal.

But this summer, several parks and recreation departments and YMCA's across the country are reporting a shortage of lifeguards. And an improving economy may be playing a big role.

The Ridge Road swimming pool in Raleigh, N.C. is packed. There are easily 200 people here competing in a swim meet, some of them as young as 5 years old.

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The Two-Way
4:17 pm
Tue July 28, 2015

Imprisoned Israeli Spy Jonathan Pollard To Be Released In November

Jonathan Pollard speaks during an interview at the Federal Correctional Institution in Butner, N.C., in May 1998.
Karl DeBlaker AP

Originally published on Tue July 28, 2015 8:46 pm

Updated at 8:45 p.m.

Jonathan Pollard, who has served almost 30 years in prison after being convicted of espionage, will be granted parole on Nov. 21, according to his attorneys.

The former civilian Navy analyst was arrested in 1985 and charged with passing classified information to Israel. He pleaded guilty and received a life sentence.

"But under laws in place at the time, that meant he could get parole after 30 years," NPR's Carrie Johnson says. "Now, that term is nearly up — and the Justice Department did not stand in the way of his release."

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World Cafe
4:08 pm
Tue July 28, 2015

World Cafe Sense Of Place — Stockholm: ABBA The Museum

ABBA The Museum.
John Vettese/XPN

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The Two-Way
4:02 pm
Tue July 28, 2015

Human Error Caused Virgin Galactic Crash, Investigators Say

SpaceShipTwo crashed in the Mojave Desert in California on Oct. 31. The co-pilot was killed.
Ringo H.W. Chiu AP

The crash of a Virgin Galactic spaceship last fall in California's Mojave Desert was caused by pilot error and design problems, the National Transportation and Safety Board announced Tuesday after a nine-month investigation.

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