Imagine creating the best work of your life, some of the best music of its day, and no one cares. Now imagine playing those songs 47 years later to a screaming and loving bunch of fans and getting what seems like a hero's welcome. That's part of the story of The Zombies, who played the classic 1968 album Odessey and Oracle, along with a set of other hits and brand new songs, live in Washington, D.C. last month. Now we have their nearly note-for-note live reproduction of Odessey and Oracle for you here.

The Current Presents: Laura Marling

Oct 20, 2015

Laura Marling's latest album, this year's Short Movie, features a fuller, more plugged-in sound. But when she came to visit The Current's studio, Marling returned to her roots and performed an acoustic set. Inspired by the time the English singer spent in Los Angeles during a songwriting hiatus, Short Movie encourages listeners to embrace spontaneity, as you can hear in this performance of "How Can I."


  • "How Can I"

Pinkish Black swings moods like none other. Since 2010, the Fort Worth, Texas, duo has stuck to synths, drums and Daron Beck's Gothic croon without the urge to expand — but it evolves expansively anyway. Bottom Of The Morning, the band's third record, all but abandons Pinkish Black's previous metallic tendencies for the eerie heft of '70s Italian horror-movie soundtracks (think Goblin or Ennio Morricone on a sinister jazz kick).

On the release date for his new album, B'lieve I'm Goin Down, Philly rocker Kurt Vile brought together a group of musicians he called the "best of the East Coast and West Coast combined," including drummer Stella Mozgawa from Warpaint, to play a live session for KCRW. It marked the live debut of "Life Like This," a highlight from Vile's most introspective and confident album yet.


  • "Life Like This"

It's a relatively controversy-free list of potential inductees for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame this year, although die-hards always find a reason for outrage at inclusions or omissions. Sorry again, fans of Bon Jovi, The Cure. And apparently someone was even rooting for Moby.

It can take years for a musician to discover his or her voice. But in the meantime, they find themselves by discovering the music of other artists. With a wide-ranging catalog spanning 30 years, Yo La Tengo is its own band, but the trio has become just as noted for its huge repertoire of cover songs.

Join NPR Music live on Oct. 22 at 8:30 p.m. ET for an NPR Music Presents showcase during the annual CMJ Music Marathon.

Please note times are subject to change. Our live video webcast will feature:

• Elle Varner (11 p.m. ET)

The Grammy- and BET Award-nominated R&B artist, who as the daughter of two songwriters grew up in the music industry, will take the stage to perform tracks from her forthcoming sophomore album, 4 Letter Word.

• Lia Ices (10:05 p.m. ET)

Ed Miles courtesy of the Artist

Join NPR Music at 8 p.m. ET on Sunday, Sept. 28, for a live video webcast featuring rock 'n' roll 

  legend Robert Plant and his band. We'll webcast the show from the Nonesuch At BAM music festival in Brooklyn. The former Led Zeppelin singer released a new solo album, titled lullaby and... The Ceaseless Roar, earlier this month.

Robert Plant was just brilliant in Brooklyn on Sept. 28. Plant and his Sensational Space Shifters played a stunning set of music that did what Robert Plant does best: mixing up American blues, British rock, North African rhythms and even some electronica with that voice, still filled with passion after all these years.

The All Weather Lunch can still be heard on WITH-FM, Ithaca, our sister station. You can listen to it on 90.1FM in the southern Finger Lakes area, or online here.