WRUR 88.5 Different Radio

What Makes A Great Album Last?

The season of list-making, specifically (for us) lists about the year's best music, is rapidly descending. But before the craziness begins over who had the best album or song in 2017, we thought we'd look back at some of our previous top-ten lists to see if they even hold up. As you can imagine, some albums we once thought were great have since lost their luster, while others haven't aged a day. This got us wondering: Why? And what, exactly, makes a great album last? When an album doesn't...

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News & Views from WRUR

October at The Little Cafe: (follow link for more information)

Wednesday October 4 (7-9pm)  Margaret Explosion

Thursday October 5 (7-9pm) Big Blue House

Friday October 6 (8-10pm) Auld Lang Syne

Saturday October 7  (8-10pm) Connie Deming

Monday October 9 (7-9pm) Watkins and the Rapiers

Tuesday October 10 (7-9pm) Lakeshore @ The Little: Jerry Falzone, Cammy Enaharo, Maria Sebastian,                                                                    Chris Wilson

This week: our final (finally) rebroadcast before our new season starts on October 7!

A Vietnam Soundscape

Sep 24, 2017
Oliver Noonan/Associated Press

During World War I, soldiers carried song books in their kit bags. In World War II, some soldiers had access to radios and could hear Glenn Miller and the Army-Air Force Band perform. Others were lucky enough to catch Bob Hope headline a USO show. During the Korean War the military set up its own radio network, Armed Forces Radio (Korea). Vietnam had all these outlets and more. Its GIs brought their own radios and instruments from home. They bought records and swapped tapes of their favorite music.

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WRUR Song of the Day Video

Latest Different Radio Music News

Vince Staples is impossible to categorize. A Southern Cali MC who prides himself on his Long Beach bona fides while eschewing the prototypical gangsta rap tag with which he's often mis-labled, he's a natural at bucking the status quo. Yet he also sees clear divisions between art and commerce that lead him to question how institutions choose to define — or fail to distinguish — the two.

Benjamin Booker has a deeply tender voice that, at times, can feel like a whisper But it always cuts to the heart. "Believe," his opening number at the Tiny Desk has a yearning for something to hold on to, something to understand. It's a timeless desire which can be about the personal or the political.

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World Cafe on WRUR

The premier public radio showcase for contemporary music serving up an eclectic blend that includes blues, rock, world, folk, and alternative country.
Courtesy of the Artist

If you’re a Sheryl Crow fan, at some point you’ve put on one of her old records for inspiration… Turns out – she does the exact same thing! Or at least she did when it came to make her latest record called Be Myself. We revisit our interview with Sheryl from later April, where we talked about recapturing her early 90s spirt and hear her perform new songs. She will be playing a sold out concert at the Jazz Festival on June 29th.

This week: a look back to our October 2. 2016 broadcast from the Fitzgerald Theater in Saint Paul, Minnesota. Nathaniel Rateliff & the Night Sweats perform "Wasting Time" and "Out on the Weekend," Anais Mitchell sings "Why We Build the Wall" and "Clyde Waters," and John Hodgman shared a few thoughts on beards and septic systems.

John Peets/Courtesy of the artist

Rhiannon Giddens and her producer Dirk Powell join World Cafe Nashville correspondent Ann Powers with the new album Freedom Highway. Giddens shares what it was like to inhabit African American voices from the past in songs like "At the Purchaser's Option" and how slavery was wrapped into the fabric of all of American society.

The Little Theatre is ready to party like it’s 1929!

The newly renovated Little Theatre marquee will reclaim its place as one of Rochester’s visual landmarks on Monday, June 12, with a Marquee Relighting Block Party. The street celebration begins outside The Little (240 East Ave.) at 6:30 p.m. and the relighting presentation begins at 8:30 p.m.

After a brief set of presentations at 8:30 p.m., the new marquee will be switched on for the first time at dusk.

Emma SIlverstone for WXPN

The American political climate inspired a lot of the lyrics on Gov't Mule's latest rock 'n' roll record, Revolution Come... Revolution Go.

ALYSSE GAFKJEN / COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

  Our guest in this session is The Black Keys' Dan Auerbach, whose new solo album is called Waiting On A Song. The record is a product of Auerbach's move to Nashville, where he met some of the heavy collaborators who appear on it — including John Prine, who co-wrote the title song. Waiting On A Song also features veteran songwriter Pat McLaughlin, Grammy winner David Ferguson, Duane Eddy, Jerry Douglas and Mark Knopfler. In this session, Auerbach discusses how he got them to play on the album and performs some of the new songs.  

Melissa Stilwell

21 year old Colter Wall has already begun turning heads in the country scene with high praise from big names like Steve Earle and Rick Rubin. Nashville correspondent Ann Powers uncovers the talent that has Music City buzzing, with a voice and depth of songwriting far beyond his years.

Hayley Young/Courtesy of the artist

Portugal. The Man's new single “Feel it Still” is a danceable earworm. In this interview the band reveals the covert messages the song contains about the social injustices today, and discuss the eclectic music festival feel of their upcoming album Woodstock.

MICHAEL LOCCISANO / GETTY IMAGES

Gregg Allman died May 27, 2017, at the age of 69. He's remembered by the music world as a founding member of the Allman Brothers Band and one of the pioneers of Southern rock. We revisit Allman's last visit to World Cafe in 2011, when he performed songs from his seventh solo studio album, Low Country Blues. We also will visit with the Old 97's. 

For decades, The Beatles' Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band has ranked highly on many All-Time Best Album lists. Celebrated as the first quasi-concept album in rock, fans and critics have long lauded the songcraft, the pioneering production sounds, and its colorful, now iconic, cover art. Some say it both reflected and drove the burgeoning youth culture through the "Summer of Love" in 1967. In more recent years, some critics have tried to cut through the mythology of the album and reconsider it in every way.

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